Latest Tweets:

troke:

sheishurr:

Classic.

These changed my life

Omar

(Source: lindsaybluth, via scandalous-vanitym)

birthdayhex:

birthdayhex:

birthdayhex:

alexandraelle:

queennubian:

gimptips:

jebbcole53:

Trying to get this on as many social media platforms as possible.
A Fight to Survive TBI: The Story of David On the Road to Recover from Traumatic Brain Injury.
August 24, 2012 drastically changed my life. What happened that evening has left David in a vegetative coma and I am desperate to save my son’s life and future. David was pistol whipped, had his jaw broken and then his unconscious body was robbed. Though David regained consciousness, he was incoherent and rushed by ambulance to UMDNJ trauma center in Newark, New Jersey. It was there that he underwent emergency craniotomy surgery to alleviate the pressure from his swelling brain.
He is currently living in a sub-acute unit at a nursing home being fed via a gastric feeding tube. He is no longer entitled to physical therapy because he has shown no signs of progress. This means each day he lies in bed approximately 19 hours and sit in a wheelchair for 5 hours with no physical stimulation aside from being dressed and his diaper changed.
The importance behind physical therapy is that it will help him maintain his muscles and joints; to achieve his goal to attain flexibility, balance and coordination free from pain or suffering, so that he may lead a normal life again; performing all of his daily activities with minimal or no difficulty and without dependency. It can even help with his cardiopulmonary and neurological functions.
With prolonged treatment, it is possible for him to regain a large share, if not all of his mobility and it will improve his overall fitness and health.
David’s survival depends on continued physical and mental stimulation therapies which most insurances are not willing to fund long term. The lack of such treatment poses a direct threat to David’s ability to return to a life that extend beyond sitting in front of a television for hours on end in a nursing home. He deserves better.
His recovery is destined to be a long and arduous one, with no guarantees. But in order for him to have that chance, he needs, aside from a miracle, funds for aggressive physical therapy, a private neurologist and a specially designed vehicle for myself to accommodate his wheel chair.
Please join my family in our fight to get David the medical and physical treatment he needs. The amount we are now trying to raise is just the beginning for David and we could use your support. Thank you!
Please reblog, donate, and pray for David #teamwu

http://www.gofundme.com/davidsfightforlife

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I’m donating.

$7,780 donated as of 3/16/14.

$8,260 as of 3/24/14.

$8,845 donated as of 4/8/2014

$9,180 donated as of today 4/15/14

birthdayhex:

birthdayhex:

birthdayhex:

alexandraelle:

queennubian:

gimptips:

jebbcole53:

Trying to get this on as many social media platforms as possible.

A Fight to Survive TBI: The Story of David On the Road to Recover from Traumatic Brain Injury.

August 24, 2012 drastically changed my life. What happened that evening has left David in a vegetative coma and I am desperate to save my son’s life and future. David was pistol whipped, had his jaw broken and then his unconscious body was robbed. Though David regained consciousness, he was incoherent and rushed by ambulance to UMDNJ trauma center in Newark, New Jersey. It was there that he underwent emergency craniotomy surgery to alleviate the pressure from his swelling brain.

He is currently living in a sub-acute unit at a nursing home being fed via a gastric feeding tube. He is no longer entitled to physical therapy because he has shown no signs of progress. This means each day he lies in bed approximately 19 hours and sit in a wheelchair for 5 hours with no physical stimulation aside from being dressed and his diaper changed.

The importance behind physical therapy is that it will help him maintain his muscles and joints; to achieve his goal to attain flexibility, balance and coordination free from pain or suffering, so that he may lead a normal life again; performing all of his daily activities with minimal or no difficulty and without dependency. It can even help with his cardiopulmonary and neurological functions.

With prolonged treatment, it is possible for him to regain a large share, if not all of his mobility and it will improve his overall fitness and health.

David’s survival depends on continued physical and mental stimulation therapies which most insurances are not willing to fund long term. The lack of such treatment poses a direct threat to David’s ability to return to a life that extend beyond sitting in front of a television for hours on end in a nursing home. He deserves better.

His recovery is destined to be a long and arduous one, with no guarantees. But in order for him to have that chance, he needs, aside from a miracle, funds for aggressive physical therapy, a private neurologist and a specially designed vehicle for myself to accommodate his wheel chair.

Please join my family in our fight to get David the medical and physical treatment he needs. The amount we are now trying to raise is just the beginning for David and we could use your support. Thank you!

Please reblog, donate, and pray for David #teamwu

http://www.gofundme.com/davidsfightforlife

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I’m donating.

$7,780 donated as of 3/16/14.

$8,260 as of 3/24/14.

$8,845 donated as of 4/8/2014

$9,180 donated as of today 4/15/14

I was weak then and you proved it…

(Source: fuckyeahjhene.com, via fuckyeahjhene)

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

so-treu:

indypendentstyles:

Yasmeen Ghauri in Christian Lacroix

so i found my wedding dress

dem earrings tho. GRABBY HANDS

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

so-treu:

indypendentstyles:

Yasmeen Ghauri in Christian Lacroix

so i found my wedding dress

dem earrings tho. GRABBY HANDS

tsehaipublishers:

"The definition of Afro Goth is a subculture of African and dark skinned men and women that have a passion for goth and/or emo style in dress, music, and personality. The goth style tends to gravitate towards a darker palette and both clothes and makeup using cimmerian undertones."

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

materialworld:

The history of segregation in the United States is often seen in black and white. Leslie Bow, professor of English and Asian American studies, is interested in the experiences of communities that fell outside those color lines.
In her new book, Partly Colored: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South, Bow examines what segregation demanded of people who did not fall into the category of black or white — including Asians, American Indians and people of mixed race.
Wisconsin Week: What did segregation mean for people who — as you described it — stood outside the color lines? You posed the question, “Where did the Asian sit on the segregated bus?’
Leslie Bow: I think what’s most interesting to me about a project like this is that we often conflate race with African-Americans or see race as a black-white issue. When we say “multiculturalism” … we don’t think conceptually or theoretically about the challenge that poses to the way we think about racial history in the United States… …
WW: You mentioned your parents, who are Chinese-American. They attended white schools in Arkansas but didn’t socialize with and weren’t invited to the homes of their white classmates and I wondered how much their experience impacted your research interests?
LB: Definitely, because it was something that they themselves did not talk about. What I found was that they mediated that experience by creating a third level of segregation where there was limited social engagement with either whites or blacks. Their social context was wholly Chinese-American at the time. So, to me that was just the jumping off point for really an exploration of ambiguity…(via Mixed Race Studies » Leslie Bow)

materialworld:

The history of segregation in the United States is often seen in black and white. Leslie Bow, professor of English and Asian American studies, is interested in the experiences of communities that fell outside those color lines.

In her new book, Partly Colored: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South, Bow examines what segregation demanded of people who did not fall into the category of black or white — including Asians, American Indians and people of mixed race.

Wisconsin Week: What did segregation mean for people who — as you described it — stood outside the color lines? You posed the question, “Where did the Asian sit on the segregated bus?’

Leslie Bow: I think what’s most interesting to me about a project like this is that we often conflate race with African-Americans or see race as a black-white issue. When we say “multiculturalism” … we don’t think conceptually or theoretically about the challenge that poses to the way we think about racial history in the United States… …

WW: You mentioned your parents, who are Chinese-American. They attended white schools in Arkansas but didn’t socialize with and weren’t invited to the homes of their white classmates and I wondered how much their experience impacted your research interests?

LB: Definitely, because it was something that they themselves did not talk about. What I found was that they mediated that experience by creating a third level of segregation where there was limited social engagement with either whites or blacks. Their social context was wholly Chinese-American at the time. So, to me that was just the jumping off point for really an exploration of ambiguity…(via Mixed Race Studies » Leslie Bow)

(via navigatethestream)

"Incredible change happens in your life when you decide to take control of what you do have power over instead of craving control over what you don’t."

Steve Maraboli, Life, the Truth, and Being Free (via observando)

(via psych-facts)

onespecialnigga:

ebbaliciousz:

yeslikethefuckinmermaid:

right on point tho

Perf

my sister said that look like flappy bird

onespecialnigga:

ebbaliciousz:

yeslikethefuckinmermaid:

right on point tho

Perf

my sister said that look like flappy bird

(Source: keogdh, via cleophatrajones)

*27

yagazieemezi:

Julia Noni Captures Kenya’s Elite Runners in Nairobi For Nike.

Ready on view at the solo exhibition “Run The Way You Were Meant To” in China at Nike’s new X158 concept store in Shanghai.

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via ourafrica)

reverseracism:

reclaimingthenativetag:

k-the-man:

reclaimingthenativetag:

Chipewyan, a name given to us by the Cree which means ‘pointed skin’, (in reference to the clothes the Chipewyan wore) is an Aboriginal group that spans across the northern parts of Canada. However, most Chipewyan prefer to be called Dene (‘the people’) in place of Chipewyan.
I am not Indian. I have no ancestors from India.
I am a mixed race First Nations person whose history is rooted in the Dene people from Canada and the Aztec people in El Salvador.
Indigenous people are not a costume. Indigenous people are not a trend. Indigenous people are important and need to start getting the respect they deserve. - Mod M

While you’re at it don’t dress up as pirates either because pirates are not a costume. Pirates are not a trend. Pirates are important and need to start getting the respect they deserve. 
I say we just ban costumes over all so we don’t offend any group of people, because we all know; If you are offended, you’re always in the right.

Case 237618361318 of white people not getting it. - Mod M

I agree with Mod M, the previous poster honestly does not understood or care about what the original poster has said.
Trivializing culture and denying human rights is a destructive nature often found in those who’s culture and human nature have never been denied, let alone questioned.

reverseracism:

reclaimingthenativetag:

k-the-man:

reclaimingthenativetag:

Chipewyan, a name given to us by the Cree which means ‘pointed skin’, (in reference to the clothes the Chipewyan wore) is an Aboriginal group that spans across the northern parts of Canada. However, most Chipewyan prefer to be called Dene (‘the people’) in place of Chipewyan.

I am not Indian. I have no ancestors from India.

I am a mixed race First Nations person whose history is rooted in the Dene people from Canada and the Aztec people in El Salvador.

Indigenous people are not a costume. Indigenous people are not a trend. Indigenous people are important and need to start getting the respect they deserve. - Mod M

While you’re at it don’t dress up as pirates either because pirates are not a costume. Pirates are not a trend. Pirates are important and need to start getting the respect they deserve. 

I say we just ban costumes over all so we don’t offend any group of people, because we all know; If you are offended, you’re always in the right.

Case 237618361318 of white people not getting it. - Mod M

I agree with Mod M, the previous poster honestly does not understood or care about what the original poster has said.

Trivializing culture and denying human rights is a destructive nature often found in those who’s culture and human nature have never been denied, let alone questioned.

(via reverseracism)

FOX News Presenter: "Well, the UConn Huskies are the 2014 NAACP National Champs…"

(Source: hotandsaxy, via fallontonight)

Good Morning!

"Energy, like you, has no beginning and no end. It can never be destroyed. It is only ever shifting states."

Panache Desai (via psychedeliknights)

(Source: purplebuddhaproject, via mydamncurls)